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Oral Hygiene Aids

Regular dental check ups are essential for maintaining excellent oral hygiene and diagnosing potential problems, but they are not a “fix-all” solution. Thorough oral homecare routines should be practiced on a daily basis to avoid future dental problems.

Periodontal disease (also called gum disease and periodontitis) is the leading cause of tooth loss in the developed world, and is completely preventable in the vast majority of cases. Professional cleanings twice a year combined with daily self-cleaning can remove a high percentage of disease-causing bacteria and plaque. In addition, teeth that are well cared for make for a sparkling white smile.

There are numerous types of oral hygiene aids on the supermarket shelves, and it can be difficult to determine which will provide the best benefit to your teeth.

The Most Confusing Aisle In The Store??

If you have been shopping for toothpaste lately, you know that it can be very confusing.

Unlike the old days when the choices were few, these days it seems that there are way too many options!  Whitening toothpastes, tartar control, paste or gel, desensitizing, - which is best?  This is a question we get asked all the time.  Sometimes it seems like the best thing to do would be to forget the labels and buy whatever is on sale!!

The fact is - buying a particular type or brand of toothpaste is usually not as important as the way you brush and how often you do so.  But in any case, here is a quick run - down.

Tartar control toothpaste:  Tartar is calcified plaque which naturally forms and can wreak havoc on your teeth and gums.  While tartar control toothpaste has been shown to reduce the formation of new deposits, it can't remove current ones and does nothing to prevent these formations where they are the most dangerous - underneath the gum line.

Paste vs. gel:  No significant difference here; it's more of a personal preference.

Desensitizing toothpaste:  These pastes have ingredients in them which block the small tube - like channels that connect to the nerve tissue inside of your teeth.  If you have exposed roots due to gum recession or teeth that are generally sensitive to hot or cold, this may be a good solution for you.  But please be patient - it takes 4 to 6 weeks for the magic to kick in.

Whitening pastes:  The abrasiveness of these products may reduce surface stains, but they do little to treat the actual yellowing of teeth from the inside.  The good news is that most teeth can be whitened with the right treatment.  Be sure to ask us what the proper whitening method is for you.

"Gum Care" toothpaste:  Studies have shown these to be questionable at best, and they may not be as valuable as standard toothpastes in preventing cavities.

Expensive or bargain brand? The good news here is that price doesn't seem to be related to effectiveness when choosing a toothpaste.  As a matter of fact, recently Consumer Reports magazine rated an expensive paste near the bottom of their list with bargain basement Ultra-Brite near the top in several categories!

So which brand should I use?

Most studies are fairly inconclusive on this one.  Your best bet is always a brand that contains fluoride and has the American Dental Association seal of approval.  And if that brand happens to be on sale - all the better!!

In the end, the most important thing is to brush often (morning, night-time, and after every meal), use a soft brush, try to reach every surface of every tooth, and spend two minutes doing so.

The proper technique is important as well, and we will be glad to demonstrate this to you at your next visit to Parkside Dental Care!  If you have any more questions or would like to set up a visit, please give us a call at 334-271-9916.  We are here to help you!

 

Here are some of the most common oral hygiene aids for homecare:

Dental Flosses

Dental floss is the most common interdental and subgingival (below the gum) cleaner and comes in a variety of types and flavors. The floss itself is made from either thin nylon filaments or polyethylene ribbons, and can help remove food particles and plaque from between the teeth. Vigorous flossing with a floss holder can cause soft tissue damage and bleeding, so great care should be taken. Floss should normally be used twice daily after brushing.

Interdental Cleaners

Many hygienist & periodontists recommend interdental brushes in addition to dental floss. These tiny brushes are gentle on the gums and very effective in cleaning the contours of teeth in between the gums. Interdental brushes come in various shapes and sizes.

Mouth Rinses

There are two basic types of mouth rinse available: Cosmetic rinses which are sold over the counter and temporarily suppress bad breath, and therapeutic rinses which may or may not require a prescription. Most dentists are skeptical about the benefits of cosmetic rinses because several studies have shown that their effectiveness against plaque is minimal. Therapeutic rinses however, are regulated by the FDA and contain active ingredients that can help reduce bad breath, plaque, and cavities. Mouth rinses should generally be used after brushing.

Oral Irrigators

Oral irrigators, like Water Jets and Waterpiks have been created to clean debris from below the gum line. Water is continuously sprayed from tiny jets into the gum pockets which can help remove harmful bacteria and food particles. Overall, oral irrigators have proven effective in lowering the risk of gum disease and should not be used instead of brushing and flossing. Professional cleanings are recommended at least twice annually to remove deeper debris.

Rubber Tip Stimulators

The rubber tip stimulator is an excellent tool for removing plaque from around the gum line and also for stimulating blood flow to the gums. The rubber tip stimulator should be traced gently along the outer and inner gum line at least once each day. Any plaque on the tip can be rinsed off with tap water. It is important to replace the tip as soon as it starts to appear worn, and to store the stimulator in a cool, dry place.

Tongue Cleaners

Tongue cleaners are special devices which have been designed to remove the buildup of bacteria, fungi and food debris from the tongue surface. The fungi and bacteria that colonize on the tongue have been related to halitosis (bad breath) and a great many systemic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, respiratory disease and stroke. Tongue cleaners can be made from metal, wood or plastic and shaped in accordance with the contours of the tongue. Tongue cleaning should be done prior to brushing to prevent the ingestion of fungi and bacteria.

Toothbrushes

There are a great many toothbrush types available. Electric toothbrushes are generally recommended by dentists because electric brushes are much more effective than manual brushes. The vibrating or rotary motion helps to easily dislodge plaque and remove food particles from around the gums and teeth. The same results can be obtained using a manual brush, but much more effort is needed to do so.

Manual toothbrushes should be replaced every three months because worn bristles become ineffective over time. Soft bristle toothbrushes are far less damaging to gum tissue than the medium and hard bristle varieties. In addition, an appropriate sized ADA approved toothbrush should be chosen to allow proper cleaning to all the teeth. Teeth should ideally be brushed after each meal, or minimally twice each day.

If you have any questions about oral hygiene aids, please ask your dentist or dental hygienist.

Contact Us.We encourage you to contact us with any questions or comments you may have. Please call our office or use the quick contact form.

Contact Us

We encourage you to contact us with any questions or comments you may have. Please call our office or use the quick contact form below.
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